submitted by http://blacktrashh.tumblr.com/

submitted by http://blacktrashh.tumblr.com/

submitted by: smilejuliet.tumblr.com

submitted by: smilejuliet.tumblr.com

soulofsade.tumblr.com
IG: shennelnsade

soulofsade.tumblr.com

IG: shennelnsade

humansofnewyork:

She said she wanted to be a pilot, and when I asked why, she spoke two words. My translator said: “She says, something like: ‘I want to be able to control myself in the air.’”"But what exactly did she say?" I asked.“‘Kuar Nhial,’ he answered. ‘It means: ‘I’ll be the leader of the air.’”(Tongping Internally Displaced Persons Site, Juba, South Sudan)

humansofnewyork:

She said she wanted to be a pilot, and when I asked why, she spoke two words. My translator said: “She says, something like: ‘I want to be able to control myself in the air.’”
"But what exactly did she say?" I asked.
“‘Kuar Nhial,’ he answered. ‘It means: ‘I’ll be the leader of the air.’”

(Tongping Internally Displaced Persons Site, Juba, South Sudan)

Shocking History: Why Women of Color in the 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair in Public
"…a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty.
Black and multi racial women began to adopt the tignon, but not without a little ingenuity. Many tied the tignon in elaborate ways and used beautiful fabrics and other additions to the headdress to make them appealing. In the end, what was meant to draw less attention to them made these ladies even more beautiful and alluring.
This bit of history only makes me feel even more proud about wearing my natural hair out or in pretty head wraps.
My take away: We should realize and embrace the inherent beauty of our blackness and all that makes us unique, especially our hair. Even history teaches us it’s all so notably beautiful!”
Read the article here

Shocking History: Why Women of Color in the 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair in Public

"…a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.

Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty.

Black and multi racial women began to adopt the tignon, but not without a little ingenuity. Many tied the tignon in elaborate ways and used beautiful fabrics and other additions to the headdress to make them appealing. In the end, what was meant to draw less attention to them made these ladies even more beautiful and alluring.

This bit of history only makes me feel even more proud about wearing my natural hair out or in pretty head wraps.

My take away: We should realize and embrace the inherent beauty of our blackness and all that makes us unique, especially our hair. Even history teaches us it’s all so notably beautiful!”

Read the article here

dswsubmit:

http://darkskinwomen.com/
Tumblr: @laurenslove-
IG: @iwant_candie

dswsubmit:

http://darkskinwomen.com/

Tumblr: @laurenslove-

IG: @iwant_candie

damionkare:


Afropunk 2014
Fort Greene, Brooklyn
Photographer: Damion Reid
IG: @BOTBW2013

damionkare:

Afropunk 2014

Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Photographer: Damion Reid

IG: @BOTBW2013

(Source: darkgirlswirl)

accras:

Teyonah Parris at the GBK Productions Pre-Emmy Gifting Lounge, 8/23/14

accras:

Teyonah Parris at the GBK Productions Pre-Emmy Gifting Lounge, 8/23/14

(Source: instagram.com, via darkgirlswirl)

damionkare:


Afropunk 2014
Fort Greene, Brooklyn
Photographer: Damion Reid
IG: @BOTBW2013

damionkare:

Afropunk 2014

Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Photographer: Damion Reid

IG: @BOTBW2013

(via blackfashion)

submitted by: http://victorialacrest.tumblr.com
humansofnewyork:

"They sometimes ask me about their grandmother, and I only tell them about the good times. I don’t want to worry them with all the things my mother and I had to go through when I was growing up.""What’s your fondest memory of your mother?”"We were so poor that every day she’d have to go out and try to find us some food. And on the days when she came home empty handed, she’d help us forget our hunger by putting on music and dancing for us."(Jinja, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"They sometimes ask me about their grandmother, and I only tell them about the good times. I don’t want to worry them with all the things my mother and I had to go through when I was growing up."
"What’s your fondest memory of your mother?
"We were so poor that every day she’d have to go out and try to find us some food. And on the days when she came home empty handed, she’d help us forget our hunger by putting on music and dancing for us."

(Jinja, Uganda)